Robredo rallies Filipinos to show
‘united front rather than criticize’

June 26 2017 5:28 PM

Leni Robredo Image from OPV twitter

Amid the continuing crisis in Marawi City, Vice President Leni Robredo rallied Filipinos on Monday to show a “united front . . .  rather than criticize.”

Rather than find fault, Robredo said the people should stand together behind the government to defeat the threat of terrorism.

“Ako, gusto kong maniwala na lahat ginagawa,” she said when asked for her assessment of the military’s handling of the Marawi crisis.

(As far as I am concerned, I want to believe that everything is being done.)

“Mahirap kasi ngayon na wala tayong united front. Dapat more than at any other time sa ating bansa, ngayon dapat tayong magpakita na nagkakaisa tayo. Kaya iyong lahat ng puwedeng ma-contribute ng bawat isa sa atin, dapat ibigay,” she said.

(It is difficult for us not to have a united front. More than at any other time in our country, we should now stand united. This is why let us give what each of us can contribute.)

She said the government “is not perfect,” but stressed that all Filipinos must come together to help.

“Pagtulungan natin lahat. Iyong sa atin, lahat tayo may responsibilidad na makipagtulungan, rather than criticize tayo nang mag-criticize, magtulungan na lang tayo kasi maraming pangangailangang talagang kailangan sagutin,” she said.

(Let us all help together. Rather than criticize,  we all have a responsibility to help because so much needs to be done.)

Robredo visited on Monday, June 26, the Balo-I evacuation site in Lanao del Norte, where some of the families displaced by the fighting have sought refuge.

She thanked the private institutions providing help to the evacuees, but said that more needed to be done.  She said the question that lingered among the families was when they could return to their homes.  She also said that a number of children, when asked about their greatest fear, wrote that it was martial law.

“I think the government has been doing everything that it can. We can only hope that this will end soon, because that is the question that all the evacuees have been asking us: ‘When can we go back to Marawi? When can we go back to our respective homes?’ It is a question that we cannot answer definitely,” she said.

She added, “Halimbawa, iyong mga bata dito, pinasulat yung greatest fears sa kanila. Marami sa kanila na iyong greatest fear nila martial law. Marami sa kanila na greatest fear nila iyong hindi nila makita iyong mga mahal nila sa buhay. Kaya ito iyong dapat mag-exert tayo ng more effort, na iyong naiwan pa sa loob, sana ma-reunite na sa mga pamilya nila.”

(For example, when the kids here were asked what their greatest fears were, a lot of them said it was martial law. Many of them said it was not seeing their loved ones. That is why this is where we should exert more effort for those who were left behind, that they may be reunited with their families.)

“I think the government has been doing everything that it can. We can only hope that this will end soon, because that is the question that all the evacuees have been asking us: ‘When can we go back to Marawi? When can we go back to our respective homes?’ It is a question that we cannot answer definitely,” she said.

She added, “Halimbawa, iyong mga bata dito, pinasulat yung greatest fears sa kanila. Marami sa kanila na iyong greatest fear nila martial law. Marami sa kanila na greatest fear nila iyong hindi nila makita iyong mga mahal nila sa buhay. Kaya ito iyong dapat mag-exert tayo ng more effort, na iyong naiwan pa sa loob, sana ma-reunite na sa mga pamilya nila.”

(For example, when the kids here were asked what their greatest fears were, a lot of them said it was martial law. Many of them said it was not seeing their loved ones. That is why this is where we should exert more effort for those who were left behind, that they may be reunited with their families.)

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